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Year Completed: 2000

Design Build

Institutional/Health Care

New Construction




Alaska Seafood Manufacturing Facility

UNIT COMPANY began construction of this 220,000/SF value-added manufacturing facility and energy building in May 1998.  The owner, in the process of competitively bidding the project, exceeded the funding available.  As the low bidder, we were faced with a large and complex building project that was fully designed and ready to construct, but needed to be reduced in overall cost.  We were also faced with certain items that could not change; the owner had already purchased the structural steel, metal deck and bar joists and was providing them to the contractor.

The project could not go forward unless additional funds became available.  In the process of reviewing our bid, we saw opportunities to reduce costs and value engineer portions of the project.  We met with the owner and design team to discuss how to bring the project cost down to meet the available budget.  The owner’s confidence in our ability to deliver the project on time and within budget resulted in a guaranteed maximum price agreement.  This agreement also included value-engineering incentives if we could find additional ways to reduce costs. As a result of this revised arrangement, UNIT immediately began an extensive process of examining the scope of work with the mission of reducing cost and deleting excessive items, while never losing sight of the owner’s needs.

Industrial value-added food manufacturing plants, such as this one, tend to have large and complex construction sequencing schedules.  The schedule had to address all of the major construction milestones as well as integrate the entire owner furnished equipment and installation deadlines into the project.  The schedule became an integral management tool for the entire team. 

Our efforts to reduce the budget had to be coordinated with the design of the project.  Budget revisions had to be reviewed by the design team and then addressed through the permitting process.  When we started the project not all permits were in place. We became involved to assist the rest of the team in getting the balance of the permits as quickly as possible.  One significant challenge was to explain the complex ammonia refrigeration system in the plant and verify code compliance to local officials who had never seen a system like it.  The designers, to control and operate the ammonia refrigeration system that is one of the five largest in the United States, used complex DDC controls and programming.

We successfully met the overall budget requirements, satisfied the Owner’s operational needs, provided a facility that did not compromise quality and satisfied the requirements of a Food and Drug Administration inspected and approved facility.
 

Additional Photos

Alaska Seafood Manufacturing Facility
Alaska Seafood Manufacturing Facility
Alaska Seafood Manufacturing Facility
Alaska Seafood Manufacturing Facility